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. >> there's $750 billion of waste in health care annually. bruce brussard recently spoke to the city club of cleveland about health care, insurance, and medicare. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, welcome to the city club of cleveland. i'm president of the city club's burped of directors. i'm delighted to introduce to you the president and effective january 1, ceo, of humana inc, a phenomenonture 100 health care and health insurance provider and administrator serving over 11 million customers in the united states. over the recent election, at the center of the policy debate with implications beyond the health care industry impacting the largest fiscal pom aand larger concerns. fortunate to have with us him here to share insights on the industry and the developing policy. prior to joining humana in 2011, he was an executive, and before that, u.s. oncology, large producers and providers of health care products to to major health care institutions. with that background, he brings to the podium today a broad perspective on health care issues facing the country. he holds the undergraduate de
on the city of goma, the people of north seventh street and citizens everywhere wonder when the storm has passed our rebels before the superstar. either way, tell tell signs in history indicate that the conflict will continue unless appropriate deterring measures are taken. m23 at its precursor exposed congo as a dysfunctional state but we put up a leadership and lacking a combatant army and security institutions. but the feeling of the state, all community grievances, demographic, ethnic expansion and control of resources has turned eastern congo into a tinderbox. this means ambitious ashburn in recent demagogues only need to cause and find a sponsor can be a communitycome the business can the political state to start the militia. m23, primarily √Čtude d. mono ethnic armed group fighting discrimination is one reason for the rebellion. they failed to generate important political communities such as the onion malindi who have so far refused to join m23. instead, serving the drc army and fighting the rebellion. the rebellion had also tried to take over goma can deliver to the drc. it is whe
north as delaware city in newcastle. roads and bridges in various parts of our state have been damaged and will need to be repaired or replaced. meanwhile we continue to work at fema and other agencies to determine the full extent of damage. delaware and its local jurisdictions contribute a large amount of resources and a short period of time to prepare for and respond to the storm and to begin rebuilding and its weight. eliminate damage assessment show more will be required and given already state budget we need help in filling the gaps as much as the gulf coast states needed. madam chair, and i just want to say thanks for the chance to share some of these with you today and let you know about the impacts. in delaware we have a long tradition of helping our neighbors, whether they live down the street are well beyond our borders. for years we've helped other sister state suffered from disasters be they hurricanes, tornadoes, floods or wildfires. today, the shoe is on the other foot. we need to help our neighbors, not just in delaware, but all across the country. just as we've been the
in the region and no mayor can appreciate what you and your city council and citizens have been going through and we just offer you our best in this affair. mr. jim keane has been the state director of the new york small business development and are now part since 1994. he oversees 23 regional centers, 35 outreach centers that serve 35,000 small businesses each year. all of your experience, mr. king, will most certainly be called on it tested for the job ahead of you. mr. kevin law is one of the most respected business organizations in new york. the long island economy is made up of over 100,000 businesses, 90% complete 20 people or less. bit with look forward to hearing directly from you about what your business is their same come, many struggling to recover and how we can be as helpful as possible. mayor, let us start with you and again, hearts go out to the people that you've lost and are devastated, but were going to stay with you for the long haul, long road ahead. [inaudible] >> make sure your buttons are pressed and you speak directly into the mic. >> good morning, chairwoman landrieu
at columbia. his first night in new york city -- where did he spend a? >> guest: is very dubious about this in my book, but he -- he couldn't get into his apartment. he couldn't get the key of the sublet of the front of his mother's. so he slept outside of his suitcase. he said he had called and came over there the next morning. >> host: genevieve makes the scene in new york city. who is that? >> guest: genevieve cook is an australian who's mother had a second marriage to a notable american, so the family kind of had american ties. she came to new york city and met barack obama after he graduated columbia. they had a lot in common from the moment they met. they both had indonesian connections. the father and mother had lived in indonesia. he was a diplomat. and so she had lived there. her family was in the upper crust. and so she and barry both have this connection -- the indonesian connections as well. [inaudible] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. eventually i found her and i can tell all that story because not because of the book but because of she had
a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids who get these preferences -- they will say something to the white kids and asian kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i t
appreciate what you and your city council have been going through and reoffer you our best in this effort. james king from the small business development center, 1984 overseeing 35 are reached centers, serving 35,000 businesses each year and it almost certainly be called line for the job ahead of you. the president and ceo one of the most respected in a york made up of over 100,000 businesses 90% employ 20 people or less. we look forward to hearing from you what businesses are saying when they struggle to recover and how we could be helpful. but mayor, our hearts go out to the people but we will stay with the for the long road ahead. >> good morning. it is a privilege and an honor to be here today. i am mayor dawn zimmer of hoboken new jersey. located just across the river from new york city. more than 50,000 residents and hundreds of this disses call our city the home that is why we the most densely populated city in america of. more than a year city. we rank number one of public transportation. whereby branch committee with boutiques, restaurants, outd oor cafe. but hurricane sandy was
of the southwest and others show that this has blighted development in our towns and cities. the proposal for my colleagues, that we create a long grace. for newly completed buildings, it is a sensible one. and we will introduce it next october. the previous government also plans to increase the small companies tax rates 22%, and we have cut it to 20%. unlike the small and medium-size firms, i want to thank my honorable friend for their help in this area. starting on the first of january and for the next two years. i am therefore going to increase by 10 fold in the annual investment allowance in machinery. instead of 25,000 pounds worth of investment being eligible for 100% relief, 250,000 pounds are not qualified. [cheers] this capital loans will cover cover the total investment undertaken by 99% of all of the business in britain. it is a huge thing to all those who run the business to aspire to grow and expand and create jobs. mr. speaker, i also want britain to have the most competitive tax regime of any major economy in the world. i have already cut the main rates from 20% to 24%, and is exp
. speakers include obama campaign national directors jeremy boyte at a city election day problems were unacceptable. the discussion was part of a daylong conference hosted by the pew center and it's about an hour. >>> thanks. i want to introduce the next panel. we came to this after the election after all of the talk about what went on on the election day and solve the problems we saw and of course the media picked up on and drove it out of the narrative after each election day we wanted to get experts appear to talk about what was going on in the field who really knew what was going on in the field in the days leading up to the election day so if that i will just introduced a moderator of the session that we are very lucky to have eliza newlin carney from ceq mccaul. islamic thank you. i want to thank you for having this event and all of you for coming today. we have a very distinguished panel that we are to talk about the experience of the voters on election day. pitcher me bird is a veteran of barack obama's reelection campaign and was national director of obama for america and the
. elect tri-city costs in the next 15 years. if you manufacture and establish the united states, you take advantage of the many trade agreements the united states has with the countries. whether it's a japanese cut me, thai company can chinese company manufactures in the united states, employing good american workers. .. >> the key is having the right set of advisors from investment bankers to accounting firms and law firms and pr firms and management consulting firms. >> we will leave it there. think you all for coming. think everyone. [applause] i was just going to thank everyone at asia society.org. thank you both for being here. it has been a great pleasure. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about the greatest suffering. >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> i think i have intentness that went up and told me when someone had their own agenda. >> i think that they serve as a window on the path to past what was going on with american women. >> she b
human rights. it's rather interesting that in the city in washington d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. that is almost nothing that the human rights program. the iranian audience in the reading public because it means you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic coming into an armed state. what happens in iran does not really matter to washington. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and ftd's initiative to make human rights issue a more important issue on agenda since a signal to the reading public, telling them that you do understand that a government with its own population and of course not also be trusted when it comes to international. just imagine how it behaves as it also is understood. your question about the role of the revolutionary guard, yes a revolutionary christ has inherited the estate. something also discussed by the previous panel. went home maney was making promises to the rainy pete will in the 1960s, he promised the people of iran, not democracy. he p
the significance of stem within schools and colleges around the city, and i challenge every single youth parliament member here today to go away to your cities and councils and partner organizations and try to encourage them to incorporate the significance of stem program within your schools and colleges and come back next year and share with us what you found. these are the jobs of the knowledge economy. >> now, i'm looking for a london woman. a london woman who has not spoken before. have you spoken before? you did. i think it wouldn't be fair to others. i thought you had spoken earlier. this woman is going to fall off her seat and i want to see that. that would be a sadness. >> i'm -- thank you, mr. speaker. thank you. [applause] >> anybody here who knows today that i was desperate to pike about this? i was on bbc news and a woman told me i didn't deserve is because i -- i'm going to use that speakers on bbc so clearly she made no sense. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> reversely, i would just like to say i'm so happy that this is one of the top five issues. education is the fuel of knowledge
in a big city like washington d.c. or baltimore or silver springs or rockwell, alexander, atlanta, i grew up on a farm and rural alabama about 50 miles from montgomery. outside a little place called joy. my father was of a tenant farmer . back in 1944 when i was only four years old my father and save $300. he bought 110 acres of land. on this farm there was a lot of cotton and corn, peanuts, hogs, cows, and chickens. on the farm it was my responsibility to care for the chickens. i fell in love with raising chickens like no one else to raise chickens. any of you know anything about raising chickens to mechanize events of those? okay. as a little boy, placed them and waited for three long weeks for the little chicks hatch. some of you may be saying, why do you. [indiscernible] well, from time to time another and would get on that same nest. there would be more eggs. you have to deal to tell the first from the ones that were already under there. that's okay. it's all right. what hatch. take these six. raise them on year-round. just give them to another and. more fresh eggs. when i look back
congo. the rebel group m23 captured territory from the troops and seized the city. actor and activist testified about his recent visit to the reaming. it's three hours. the situation the democratic republican of the congo continues to evolve. it's driven by a complex interplay of regional, power dynamics as well as an entry candidate web of economic and social issues. what is clear that the situation in the drc is tragic for the innocent people caught in the conflict. innocent people trying to raise their families and live their lives. as i have fold the media coverage of the situationed in the drc, i can't help but reflect on the manies of innocent people around the world who are caught in fundamentally unjust and socially complex situations. these situations can make anyone's heart break and naturally leads one to consider the simple question what can be done? one thing it sure makes me appreciate our country. you know, i have heard that less than 2% of the people that have ever lived here on the earth have lived under the kind of freedoms that we enjoy. we are so blessed when we se
county in rural illinois and marketing to carrollton and the city hall and they said, does this mean we have to build a new restroom for the disabled quakes the answer was yes and curb cuts and other changes that seem so superficial to many, but bitterly whether or not a disabled person can be part of america. what we did 22 years ago was really novel because if you look at the course of american history, i think we have distinguished ourselves in successive generations by expanding the reach of freedom and opportunity. think how many times who do not. if you go back to the earliest days of this great nation with older white men sat together and decided who would rule america, they were thinking about those of color. they were thinking about women. they were thinking about the disabled and they sure weren't thinking about those who work property owners. it was an elite group that would form our quote democracy. then suggested generations of americans decided if democracy went anything, if america meant anything we needed to expand the reach of opportunity each generation. the bloodiest
in baltimore -- you have been there many times yourself. you know it is a city known for his row houses, not for its rodeos. kay invited me to come into the rodeo in the astrodome. with i showed up, to her surprise -- well, i showed up, to her surprise. i had little boots on, a cowgirl hat and a vest. she put me in a buckboard and deep in the heart of texas we circled the astrodome together. i was in a buckboard. she was in a pall m palomino neo me. at the end of the evening, i was there munching on barbecue, affectionately called buckboard barb, and that's the kind of thing -- and i have the pictures to show it. they're locked up. i don't widely distribute them much but it was a heck of an evening. i say that because, again, out of that comes great friendships that also lead to smoothing the way, not paving -- actually, not smoothing the way -- paving the way, where we put our heads together to solve our national problems, a understand t and toy where we get the best ideas from a variety of approaches. and at the end of the way, we feel better but america is better off. i'm really -- i
culture. >> most things in america were. designing washington city. there is competition he submitted the design for a palace. america is like having a palace. it is not particularly awe-inspiring. in fact, in 1821 to european diplomat told the congress is neither large nor awe-inspiring, but the answer that congressmen gave set the building served his purpose. it were larger and more public and, perhaps some president would be inclined to become his permanent resident. >> next, homeland security and state department officials testified at a hearing looking into the piece of refugee programs by terrorists. posted by a house homeland security subcommittee chaired by congressman patrick meehan, this is just under an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] >> counterterrorism and intelligence will come to order. the subcommittees meeting today to your testimony regarding expectation of refugee programs by terrorists. i like to welcome everyone to today's hearings. i look forward to hearing in today's witnesses at the department of homeland security and the state department. i'd also l
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17